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    Doctrine of Signatures    
  • A pseudo-scientific belief that the hidden medicinal proper-ties or ‘virtues’ of a plant reveal themselves by the physical appear- ance of the plant; ‘the doctrine of signatures proclaimed that the Almighty … gave man a broad hint as to the use to which plants could be put. For example, those with heart-shaped fruit or bulbous roots were suitable for treatment of cardiac troubles …while scaly objects such as toothwort, pome- granate and pine-cones, relieved toothache’ (Blunt 141). This is of course nonsense. The names most closely associated with the theory are Theophrastus Bombast von hohenheim (!)

    a.k.a parcelsus (d1541) and giambattista della porta (d1605) for his publication Phytognomonica or ‘plant indicators.’

    Another late follower of the doctrine of signatures was Thomas Browne (d1682) who in his dis- course The Gardens of Cyrus identi- fies the Quincunx as a recurring geometrical arrangement that reveals a network of natural cor- respondences in nature. he glides easily from this to a the doctrine of signatures – that stones plants and roots and flowers contain encoded messages, analogies, symbols their properties uses and purpose (warner, 130).

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    The Day of the Triffids    
  • The Day of the Triffids is a post apocalyptic english science fiction novel by John wyndham published in 1951. it tells the story of a plague of blindness which befalls humanity allowing the rise of an aggressive, mobile and intelligent species of plants of mysterious origin.

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    2013 – 2014    
  • A Punk Smelling Flowers at the End of His Life: Simple Pleasures, Lesser Pleasures, Base Pleasures - (Acrylic, Collage, Canvas, String, Floor Sweepings on Paper, 140 x 220 cm)
    Underfoot VI - (Acrylic on Paper, 55 x 75cm)
    Sub Bass Shimmer - (Acrylic, screws, string, floor sweepings on paper 180 x 280cm)
    Smashed: Glittering & Perilous - (Acrylic, Mixed Media on Canvas, 120 x 200cm)
    Palm Houses & Orangeries - (Acrylic, string, floor sweepings on Canvas, 120 x 200cm)
    Mildew Swoosh - (Acrylic, String, Floor Sweepings on Board, 110 x 200cm)
    Introduced 'Harvest Moon' Species: Naked Version - (Acrylic on paper, 140 x 220cm)
    Introduced 'Harvest Moon' Species: Native Version - (Acrylic and collage on paper, 140 x 220cm)
    Crazed: Waxing/Waning II - (Acrylic and floor sweepings on panel, 200 x 150 cm)
    Vertebrae of Mammals / Caledonian Pines - (Acrylic, string, floor sweepings on panel, 110 x 200 cm)
    A Crazed Flowering (detail) - (Acrylic, collage, digital prints, string, canvas scraps, floor sweepings, canvas, paper, dimensions variable)
    A Crazed Flowering: Version - (Laserjet print, acrylic and mixed media on paper, 300 x 300 cm)
    Sub-Bass Shimmer (detail) - (Acrylic, screws, string, floor sweepings on paper)
    Crazed: Waxing/Waning II (detail) - (Acrylic and floor sweepings on panel)
    Introduced 'Harvest Moon' Species: Kwisatz Hadderach Version (detail) - (Acrylic and digital print on paper)
    Introduced 'Harvest Moon' Species: Kwisatz Hadderach Version (detail) (Acrylic on paper)
    Underfoot V - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75 cm)
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    2011 – 2012    
  • Untitled: Underfoot I - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    Untitled: Underfoot II - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    Untitled: Underfoot III - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    Untitled: Underfoot IV - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    It’s All Around Us I - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    It’s All Around Us II - (Acrylic and gloss varnish on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    It’s All Around Us III - (Dry brush acrylic on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    It’s All Around Us IV - (Dry brush acrylic on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    It’s All Around Us V - (Dry brush acrylic on paper, 55 x 75cm)
    Black Narcissus Bike Gang III - (Charcoal on Paper, 22 x 33cm)
    Black Narcissus Bike Gang II - (Charcoal on Paper, 22 x 33cm)
    Black Narcissus Bike Gang I - (Charcoal on Paper, 22 x 33cm)
    Black Narcissus Bike Gang - (Charcoal on Paper, 22 x 33cm)
    Untitled: Girl with Camera - (Screen print on paper 21 x 27 cm)
    SafePik - (Screen print on paper, 12 x 17cm)
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    Oak Trees Lullingstone Park _ Quaint Crinkle Crankle Goth    
  • (2012 – Ongoing)

    In the 1820s Samuel Palmer lived in self-imposed rural exile in the town of Shoreham, Kent. Palmer would walk for an entire day to reach Shoreham from the Old Kent Road in south London. Palmer was an autodidact and his weird, visionary, borderline psychedelic images from this period were shocking to the aesthetic sensibilities of the time. A series of large watercolour and ink drawings from this period depict the ancient oak trees of Lullingstone Park in Shoreham. Some of these trees still stand today, and one in particular bears a striking resemblance to a tree from Palmer’s suite of drawings. Since the summer of 2012 I have been making frequent trips to the park (a forty minute train ride from southeast London) and filming these trees (one in particular). The films are all made on Super 8mm, old technologies seem to suit.

    With this project I am attempting to align myself with an art-historical precedent and working to illustrate how modes of perception shift over time and I propose to eventually screen my films alongside the Palmer’s original paintings.

    The project takes its title from one of Palmer’s letters.

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    Rose Branch Minuet    
  • Rose branches from a January pruning were cut to a manageable size and brought to the studio. Laid out on the table I came to think that their thorns resembled notes on the staves of musical notation, or pins on the drum of a music box. Each branch was wrapped in tissue paper and the resulting pattern of pin prick holes was transposed onto a musical staff. This ‘composition’ was then carefully punched into a notecard which could be played back through a toyshop musicbox device. This was fixed to a violin which, functioning as a resonance chamber to amplify the sound, was in turn amplified and connected to an electronic delay. When the user ‘plays’ the instrument the sound continues to reverberate through the space for the length of the electronic delay.

    This work is accompanied by still images from a Super 8 film of the rose bush from which the branches were cut. The stills are taken one from each second of a thirty second clip, which laid out in this way resembles a Muybridge-esque early moving picture.

    (Rose branches, musical score, music box, modified violin, electronic delay, amplifier, photocopies on acetate. Dimensions variable.)

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    A Crazed Flowering    
  • Published in 2013 as an edition of 60. This 113 page document comprises the encyclopaedia A Botanical Miscellany, and the essay A Crazed Flowering. It is heavily illustrated throughout. Intended as a text to accompany exhibited work it charts a meandering path through a vast number of influences and references which inform my practice.

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    Decay    
  • An interesting study could be made of modes of decay in sci- ence fiction novels and particu- larly those of J.g. Ballard who catalogues a particularly inventive assortment: petrifaction, crystalli- sation, overgrowth, damp, drought and a number of which i’m sure have slipped my mind. From The Crystal World:

    Instantly I realized that the description of the forest ‘crystalis-ing’ and ‘turning into coloured glass’ were exactly truthful. The long arc of the trees hanging over the water dripped and glittered with myriads of prisms, the trunks and fronds of the date palms sheathed by bars of livid yellow and carmine light that bled away across the surface of the water, so that the whole scene seemed to be reproduced by an over-active technicolor process. The entire length of the opposite shore glittered with this blurred chiaroscuro, the overlap- ping bands of colour increasing the density of the vegetation, so that it was impossible to see more than a few feet between the front line of trunks (Ballard 1974, 81 & Ballard 2008, 68).

    ‘… The likeliest reversal
    of decay being petrifaction …‘ (harbison, 110).

    See also The glass Flowers at harvard.

    And of the effects wrought by botanical overgrowth upon the remains of abandoned civilisation John wyndham, mentioned above, elaborates below from The Day of The Triffids:

    Viewed impressionistically from a distance the little town was still the same jumble of small red-roofed houses and bungalows populated mostly by a comfortably retired middle class – but it was an impression that could not last more than a few minutes. Though the tiles still showed, the walls were barely visible. The tidy gardens had vanished under an unchecked growth of green, patched in colour here and there by the descendants of carefully-cultivated flowers. Even the roads looked like strips of green carpet from this distance. When we reached them we should find that the effect of soft verdure was illusory; they would be matted with coarse, tough weeds (wyndham, 241-2).

    Geoff Dyer in his book Zona (2013) – from the russian ‘zone’ – writes about the subtle magic of the damp and drippy overgrown landscape of the zone in Andrei Tarkovsky’s science fiction film Stalker (1979):

    … Weeds and plants swaying in the breeze. The tangled wires of a tilted telegraph pole. The rusting remains of a car. We are in another world that is no more than this world perceived with unprecedented atten- tiveness. Landscapes like this had been seen before Tarkovsky but … their beingness had not been seen in this way (dyer, 58).

    Dyer suggests that Tarkovsky has brought ‘this landscape – this way of seeing the world into exist- ence,’ (perhaps we should qualify that to Tarkovsky’s medium cinema):

    … Many forms of landscape depend on a particular artist. Or writer or artistic movement to render them beautiful, to make the rest of us see what has always been there (as the romantics did for mountains … ) sagging shacks, wrecked cars and fad- ing signs … [The] ‘Quality of a new world which none of the existing arts allowed to be imagined’ (dyer, 58).

    ‘Tremors from the future can be felt throughout Stalker’ says dyer (74) in its foreshadowing of the 1986 disaster at Chernobyl.

    After the evacuation the Zone of Exclusion was littered with the rusting remains of vehicles that had been used as part of the emergency cleanup. Plants stitched the empty roads and cracked concrete. Trees thrust through the warped floors of derelict buildings. Leaves changed shape. Vegetation clambered up the crumbling walls of abandoned homes (dyer, 75).

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    Chloris (Botticelli – Primavera)    
  • From the fifth book of Ovid’s Fasti in which the wood nymph Chloris’ nakedness attracted the first wind of spring, Zephyr. Zephyr pursued her and as she was ravished, flowers sprang from her mouth and she transformed into Flora, goddess of flowers.

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